UW-Madison School of Education - In the Media

School of Education "In the Media"

Our programs, students, alumni, faculty and staff are often quoted or featured in local, regional and national media. Read below for what they've had to say...


Wed
Jun
20
UW-Madison alumnus Bruce Nauman's artwork was featured in an article from the New York Times headlined, "Doing Justice to the Art of Bruce Nauman." Nauman earned his undergraduate degree from the School of Education’s Art Department in 1964, and then graduated with a master of fine arts from University of California, Davis, in 1966. “There are artists who make good work throughout their career, but good isn’t great,” curator Kathy Halbreich told the New York Times. “Bruce makes great art from graduate school to yesterday."
Thu
Jun
07
The Capital Times recently posted a report examining a unique and innovative UW-Madison Summer Term course being taught by the School of Education’s David Bell. Technology is becoming increasingly common in high-level athletics, with many teams now using GPS units to inform training. The Department of Kinesiology is in the midst of hosting an upper-level, three-week Summer Term class called, “Sports Science & Athlete Monitoring.” It focuses on the most popular technologies in the field of human performance in an effort to teach UW-Madison students how to collect data, interrupt the information and use it in a meaningful way.
Wed
Jun
06
UW-Madison’s Julie Underwood is part of a Blue Ribbon Commission on School Funding, and the panel held its final hearing at the State Capitol on Monday. The current public school funding formula is based on a revenue limit set in the early 1990s. It puts a cap on the amount of money school districts can get from the state and from local levies. “The message is absolutely clear: we’re falling short,” Underwood said during a Monday news conference. “We’re falling short on our children and we’re at a point of doing harm and we need to fix this."
Tue
Jun
05
UW-Madison’s Mitchell Nathan is quoted in a recent report that examines the explosion of so-called study-with-me videos. “I think the people making these videos are tapping into a need where you want to be social without being disrupted from your study goals,” Nathan tells the Wall Street Journal. “Think of it like parallel play. This is parallel studying: You’re ignoring each other, but that’s still much more preferable than doing it all by yourself.” Nathan is a Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of Learning Sciences with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Psychology. He also is the director of the Center on Education and Work.
Fri
Jun
01
The Isthmus newspaper recently put the spotlight on Whoopensocker, an innovative arts education initiative that works with students in local elementary schools. The program was launched with the help of UW-Madison’s Erica Halverson, who is a professor with the School of Education's No. 1-ranked Department of Curriculum and Instruction.
Mon
May
28
A commentary posted earlier this month in the San Diego Union Tribune that examines a revised higher education budget proposal from Gov. Jerry Brown utilizes research from UW-Madison’s Nicholas Hillman to question the governor’s plan. More than two-thirds of states are either developing or using some sort of performance-based funding for public colleges and universities, with performance being tracked in areas such as graduation rates and degree production numbers. Hillman, who has studied these performance-based formulas extensively, argues that this way of distributing funding is rarely effective.
Fri
May
25
New Orleans Public Radio (WWNO) recently interviewed UW-Madison’s Walter Stern about his new book that focuses on the historical intersection of race and education in that city. Earlier this month, his new book, “Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City, 1764-1960,” was released. WWNO explains how Stern's work "is the history of how New Orleans schools were used to funnel the city’s limited resources to white residents for more than 200 years. It’s also the story of how black residents have fought tirelessly for educational equality.”
Fri
May
25
Kyree Brooks, a special education master’s degree student with the School of Education, is featured in a recent Milwaukee Journal Sentinel report that’s headlined, “Wisconsin alums use #BlackandHooded to recognize African-Americans earning advanced degrees.” "Males I grew up with had no intention of getting a master's degree," Brooks, a graduate of Rufus King High School in Milwaukee, who was also featured in the report, tells the Journal Sentinel. "It's important to see people like yourself and others in educational spaces. It's about planting the seed, believing you can be there, too."
Thu
May
10
UW-Madison's Walter Stern was quoted in a story from Wisconsin Public Television's WisContext addressing parallels between recent gun control student marches and historical examples of student activism. Stern is an assistant professor with the School of Education's Department of Educational Policy Studies. Student activism is a topic Stern is researching and exploring in his current course, "The History of Student Activism." In the WPT report, Stern specifically draws parallels between current gun control student marches and Selma marches during the civil rights-era.
Wed
May
02
UW-Madison alumna Melanie Gehrke's craft kit business, The Mad Makery, was featured by Madison Magazine. Gehrke earned her bachelor's degree in Art Education from the UW-Madison School of Education in 2008. The Mad Makery helps give other people a sense of accomplishment through do-it-yourself craft kits that Gehrke makes herself. “I think especially in today’s age, everything is so digital and online,” she says. “I think for a lot of people (working with your hands) takes you kind of outside of yourself for a moment,” Gehrke told Madison Magazine. “You’re not worried about everything else that’s going on in your life.”
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