UW-Madison School of Education - In the Media

School of Education "In the Media"

Our programs, students, alumni, faculty and staff are often quoted or featured in local, regional and national media. Read below for what they've had to say...


Fri
Sep
21
Multiple researchers and a non-profit organization are telling ThinkProgress.org that the research cited in an Education Department proposal for eliminating an Obama-era rule to protect students from predatory for-profit colleges is misrepresented to incorrectly justify those plans. UW-Madison’s Nicholas Hillman is among those saying that the Education Department is misrepresenting his research findings.
Thu
Sep
13
The groundbreaking video game work of UW-Madison’s Gear Learning was featured in a recent report from Madison’s local CBS affiliate, WISC-TV/Ch. 3. Gear Learning is a game development studio housed within the School of Education’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research and led by Michael Beall. The WISC report explains how new research out of UW-Madison shows that a video game may have the power to help children develop empathy and socially beneficial behaviors such as generosity.
Mon
Sep
10
UW-Madison’s Bianca Baldridge is the author of an op-ed that explains how afterschool youth work can be both beneficial and harmful, as it perpetuates deficit-based narratives that frame black and Latinx youth as culturally deprived, academically unmotivated, and in need of saving. Baldridge is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies. She is a sociologist of education and youth worker, and the author of the forthcoming book, “Reclaiming Community: Race and the Uncertain Future of Youth Work."
Fri
Sep
07
UW-Madison's Julie Underwood takes a look back at some important Supreme Court rulings for education during the tumultuous 2017-18 Supreme Court term in her latest “Under the Law” column for Phi Delta Kappan magazine. Underwood is the Susan Engeleiter Professor of Education Law, Policy and Practice, and the former dean of the School of Education.
Thu
Sep
06
UW-Madison’s Diana Hess appeared on Wisconsin Public Radio’s “The Morning Show” earlier this week to talk about the importance of civics education. Despite requiring high schoolers to pass a civics test, Wisconsin is one of the few states in the country that doesn’t require schools to offer a civics course. Hess, who is Dean of the School of Education, has spent much of her career researching the impact of school-based civic education programs and how students experience and learn from discussions of highly controversial political issues.
Tue
Sep
04
The Reuters news agency recently put the spotlight on research conducted by UW-Madison’s David Bell. The Reuters report explains: “Children and teens who specialize in one sport may be more likely to get injured than those who play a variety of sports, a new study suggests. Researchers examined data from five previously published studies with a total of about 5,600 athletes age 18 or younger. Compared to athletes who played the widest variety of sports, youth who specialized the most were 81 percent more likely to experience an overuse injury, the study found.
Fri
Aug
24
The New Books Network recently interviewed UW-Madison’s Matthew Hora and posted a podcast interview with the author about his 2016 book, “Beyond the Skills Gap: Preparing College Students for Life and Work.” A preview of the podcast explains: "How can educators ensure that young people who attain a postsecondary credential are adequately prepared for the future? Matthew T. Hora and his co-authors, Ross Benbow and Amanda Oleson, explain that the answer is not simply that students need more specialized technical training to meet narrowly defined employment opportunities."
Tue
Aug
21
The research of UW-Madison’s Li-Ching Ho that examines “Social Harmony and Diversity” was in a recent Vialogues video. Li-Ching is an associate professor with the School of Education's Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Vialogues is a community of learners that center discussion through video. The video showcasing Li-Ching examines a study that she authored and that appeared in the Teachers College Record titled, “Social Harmony and Diversity: The Affordances and Constraints of Harmony as an Educational Goal.”
Thu
Aug
16
The Isthmus newspaper recently reported that the Middleton-Cross Plains School District is taking a look at whether or not Laura Ingalls Wilder’s books are appropriate for elementary students after the Wisconsin author’s name was removed from a national children’s award due to racist stereotypes in her books. The Isthmus utilizes the expertise of UW-Madison’s Kathleen Horning in helping to put this hot-button topic in perspective. Horning directs the School of Education's Cooperative Children's Book Center (CCBC).
Wed
Aug
15
This summer, about 100 Madison families with kids entering kindergarten will get home visits from teachers in an experimental effort to build relationships, reports The Capital Times. Beth Vaade, a program evaluation specialist with the Madison School District and co-director of the Madison Education Partnership (MEP), said the hope is to forge a bond with families so when kids go from 4-year-old kindergarten to 5-year-old classes “on that first day, they’re feeling like this is a safe place, this is a place that cares about me, and a place that I want to be part of.” The partnership is a research effort between the district, the UW-Madison School of Education’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research and community members. MEP aims to improve educational outcomes. Also leading the project is UW-Madison's Eric Grodsky, a professor of sociology and educational policy studies.
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