UW-Madison School of Education - In the Media

School of Education "In the Media"

Our programs, students, alumni, faculty and staff are often quoted or featured in local, regional and national media. Read below for what they've had to say...


Tue
Mar
26
The Hechinger Report recently reviewed a 2018 book from UW-Madison's Walter Stern, titled, "Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City, 1764-1960." Stern is a historian of education who is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies. His book details the path of segregation in New Orleans, starting with the first public high schools for black students which opened just over 100 years ago in the city.
Mon
Mar
25
A recent ​report from Nature Medicine features the expertise of UW-Madison’s Simon Goldberg, an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology. Nature Medicine’s article, “Mental health apps lean on bots and unlicensed therapists,” explores the new trend for app-based mental health care. Nature Medicine points to a study from Goldberg, who notes that his research, published in the Journal of Counseling Psychology, doesn’t really support the idea that non-licensed individuals can be effective providers of therapy.
Thu
Mar
21
On Wisconsin, UW-Madison’s alumni magazine, posted a cover story headlined, “Room for Debate: In a polarized world, UW-Madison fosters tough conversations.” Luckily, though, many at UW-Madison are actively seeking, encouraging, and developing the ability to discuss difficult topics — and not just politics. Among those featured is the Diversity Dialogues work of the School of Education’s Department of Counseling Psychology.
Tue
Mar
19
The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel recently reported on how smaller class sizes can benefit students of color, with the article featuring the insight of UW-Madison’s Elizabeth Graue, the Sorenson Professor with the School of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction, and the director of the Center for Research on Early Childhood Education (CRECE). Graue notes that the costs associated with implementing smaller class sizes can be significant.
Fri
Mar
15
The Wisconsin State Journal recently posted an article detailing UW-Madison alumna Carolyn Stanford Taylor’s journey to becoming Wisconsin’s state superintendent of public instruction. Stanford Taylor earned a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and a master’s degree in educational administration with the School of Education. The State Journal reports that Stanford Taylor’s experience of desegregation growing up in the south inspired her to a career in education, stating that it has driven her desire to create equitable learning environments for children.
Wed
Mar
13
NBC recently posted an article that features research conducted by the Cooperative Children’s Book Center (CCBC), which is housed within the UW–Madison School of Education. The CCBC publishes an annual report tracking the number of children’s books by and about people of color and from First/Native Nations. The center started tracking these numbers in 1985. “This year for the first time, we are seeing an increase in the number of books about African-Americans and Latinos that are actually being created by authors and illustrators from those two groups,” KT Horning tells NBC.
Tue
Mar
12
U.S. News and World Report released its 2020 Best Education Graduate Schools rankings on March 12, and UW-Madison is home to the highest-rated public school of education in the nation, a distinction it is sharing this year with the University of California-Los Angeles. UW–Madison’s School of Education is No. 3 overall, trailing only Ivy League privates Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania. UW–Madison, UCLA, and Stanford University all tied for the No. 3 spot. In addition, UW–Madison’s School of Education is also home to nine specialty programs ranked among the top 10 in the nation — including the top-ranked program in rehabilitation counseling.
Fri
Mar
08
UW-Madison’s Walter Stern was recently featured in a report from Milwaukee’s NPR affiliate, WUWM-89.7 FM, which examined the end of Milwaukee’s Chapter 220 desegregation program. Stern is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies. ​He is a historian of education and the author of a 2018 book titled, “Race and Education in New Orleans: Creating the Segregated City, 1764-1960.”
Wed
Mar
06
The Wisconsin State Journal (WSJ) recently covered UW-Madison student Shasparay Lighteard’s work on leading the new Black Arts Matter Festival. Lighteard, an undergraduate student working towards a degree in African American studies and a degree from the School of Education’s Department of Theatre and Drama, took the initiative last May to create a festival that celebrated black voices in the arts.
Tue
Mar
05
The latest Under the Law column ​for Kappan magazine from UW-Madison's Julie Underwood is headlined, “The legal balancing act over public school curriculum." Underwood is the Susan Engeleiter Professor of Education Law, Policy and Practice, and the former dean of the School of Education. She explains that the federal constitution has primacy, while each state has the authority to create and control school districts and define their standards and curriculum.
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