UW-Madison School of Education - News

School of Education News


Tue
Jul
11
JoAnn Heckroth Jansen, who received her bachelor’s degree in physical education from UW-Madison in 1957, still plays basketball today at the age of 82. Her team, the San Diego Splash, was recently featured in an ESPN.com video report. “An amazing group and lots of fun,” Jansen says. “The Wisconsin Spirit stays with you.”
Mon
Jul
10
WISCAPE and MadREP have released a summary report from the Apr. 26 forum on the future K-16 education in Wisconsin.
Mon
Jul
10
People at risk for Alzheimer's disease who do more moderate-intensity physical activity, but not light-intensity physical activity, are more likely to have healthy patterns of glucose metabolism in their brain, according to a new UW-Madison study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease. First author Ryan Dougherty is a graduate student studying under the direction of Dane Cook, a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology and a co-author of the study. Ozioma Okonkwo is the senior author.
Fri
Jul
07
UW-Madison’s LaVar J. Charleston was named assistant vice chancellor of student diversity, engagement and success at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. Charleston currently serves as assistant director and a senior research associate at Wisconsin’s Equity and Inclusion Laboratory (Wei LAB). Charleston, an alumnus of the School of Education, also teachers courses with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. He will assume his role at UW-Whitewater on July 24.
Thu
Jul
06
UW-Madison’s Bianca Baldridge is the lead author on a new paper that appears in the Review of Research in Education about community-based educational spaces. The paper explains how community-based educational spaces such as after-school programs and community-based youth organizations "have a long history of interrupting patterns of educational inequity and continue to do so under the current educational policy climate." Co-authors on the paper are Nathan Beck, who received a master's degree from the Department of Educational Policy Studies, and Juan Carlos Medina and Marlo A. Reeves, both of whom are current Ph.D. students with the department.
Wed
Jul
05
Video from ​the June 27 talk, “​The UW Odyssey Project: Achieving Dreams Through Higher Education,” hosted by the Wisconsin Center for the Advancement of Postsecondary Education (WISCAPE), is now available on the WISCAPE YouTube channel.
Wed
Jul
05
UW-Madison’s Rachelle Winkle-Wagner and Loyola University Chicago’s Bridget Turner Kelly co-authored a paper for the most recent edition of the Teachers College Record that is headlined, “Finding a Voice in Predominantly White Institutions: A Longitudinal Study of Black Women Faculty Members’ Journeys Toward Tenure.” Winkle-Wagner is an associate professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, and a faculty affiliate of the Wisconsin Center for the Advancement of Postsecondary Education.
Wed
Jul
05
In a new summer course at UW-Madison, undergraduate students and lifelong learners will take a “deep dive” into studying “Hamilton: An American Musical,” the record-breaking Broadway hit that takes a fresh look at the lives of the founding fathers. “Hamilton,” which was written by Lin-Manuel Miranda (who also played the lead), won 11 Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. It also broke the record for most money made in a week by a Broadway show this past November, grossing $3.3 million in just one week. Continuing Studies and the School of Education’s Department of Theatre & Drama are partnering to offer the course.
Mon
Jul
03
Each year, the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) presents awards to the most deserving members of the financial aid profession and higher education community. And among those recognized this year is UW-Madison’s Nicholas Hillman, who received the Robert P. Huff Golden Quill for his contributions to the body of research on student financial aid. Hillman was recognized for his research “focused on the relationship between financial aid and educational opportunity, particularly for underrepresented students. His work on performance-based funding has challenged conclusions among funders and policymakers that the policies are effective."
Mon
Jul
03
UW-Madison’s Andrew Ruis is the author of a newly released book titled, “Eating to Learn, Learning to Eat: The Origins of School Lunch in the United States.” Ruis is a researcher with the Epistemic Games Group housed within the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, which is part of the School of Education. Ruis' book "explores the origins of American school meal initiatives to explain why it was (and, to some extent, has continued to be) so difficult to establish meal programs that satisfy the often competing interests of children, parents, schools, health authorities, politicians, and the food industry."
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